Anshoo Agarwal

Arar, Northern Border University, Saudi Arabia
Title : Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain among special need children with genetic diseases.

Abstract

Background: A rapidly growing epidemic of obesity is associated with many health risks. Obesity is a complex condition, with serious social and psychological dimensions, affecting virtually all ages and socioeconomic groups. Sugar sweetened soft drink and beverages are highly linked to obesity and other health problems such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Consequently, there are many campaigns being launched to reduce consumption of sweetened energy among children. To create better choices for people many associations and organizations have banned sugary drinks including fruit juices in addition to sugary soda drinks. One area that is not well known as a source of excess sugar and that can increase obesity risk are soft drink and beverages s. Since children who consume these soft drink and beverages may derive as much as 12% of their sugary drink intake from these drinks, as their parents also are misguided because mostly the labels on soft drink and beverages mentions low calories and low sugar contents and they happily buy for their children or allow them to consume. Soft drink and beverages are very popular in children with genetic diseases also as their parents or guardian thinks that it will give strength to their children specially those who have physical disabilities also.

Aims and Objectives:
1. To study the attitude, perception and practices regarding Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain  among special need children with genetic diseases. 
2. To analyze the myths and facts related to intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain  among special need children with genetic diseases. 
3. To study the association between Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain  among special need children with genetic diseases.

Material and Methods:
 A pre-validated self-designed detailing information on Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain  among special need children with genetic diseases. was administered the staff and care takers and parents and guardian of children with genetic diseases. enrolled with different rehabilitation centers and schools for children with genetic diseases. in  India, Pakistan and  Nepal to study their attitude, perception and practices regarding sports or soft drink and beverages s and associated sugar contents and the myths and facts related to the reasons as why they allow their children to have such drinks. The research on this topic is limited and diverse, hence, the salient points in questionnaire were taken from the available literature and published articles. Staff and care takers and parents and guardian of children with genetic diseases. were also requested to give opinion about the calories and other details mentioned on the labels on soft drink and beverages s which their children are consuming . The children with genetic diseases. body mass index was also recorded to assess them whether they are overweight and in obese category  and was corelated with the amount of soft drink and beverages  consumed by them.

Results and Discussion:
Our study showed that there is link between excess usage of soft drink and beverages s and obesity, which may not be acknowledged as sources of sugar in children with genetic diseases.. This may be because, energy and sports drinks though may have fewer calories and less sugar than regular sugary drinks, so staff and care takers and parents and guardian of children with genetic diseases. take it for guaranteed as  they are not given awareness regarding associated health risks and as a myth they also enjoy health ‘halos’ due to an advertising focus on their cognitive benefits. It was found out that staff and care takers and parents and guardian of children with genetic diseases. are misled energy or sports drinks labels.26% of staff and care takers and parents mentioned that some labels do not convey how much sugar is actually in the product, or what  is the effect of 20 grams of carbohydrate in one Soft drink and beverages  might imply for the individual consumer. 65 % of them stated that they were not aware that the glucose found in soft drink and beverages  is a simple carbohydrate, which is dispersed into the bloodstream immediately. 69% were not aware that too much glucose, as found in soft drink and beverages s, can adversely affect memory, concentration and other forms of mental activity. It was found in our study that on the analysis of 14 different soft drink and beverages s, it showed all drinks were contained in non-reusable containers, thus providing excess sugar in a single serving. Our study showed that the added sugar intake from soft drink and beverages s had associated relationship to reduced sleep duration. 54 % of parents and care takers of children with genetic diseases. stated that they were fascinated by information on soft drink and beverages s through media like Facebook and were misguided as these drinks will help their disable children and will give them more physical and mental strength. Our study also showed that the sugar content across different brands of soft drink and beverages  was inconsistent suggesting the amount is not guided by any legal limits. 

Conclusion:
This study conclude that soft drink and beverages s consumption is an increasingly dangerous, yet overlooked health issue for a variety of reasons, especially among children with genetic diseases. who are already physically and mentally challenged and where consumption is widespread. The added sugar content in the form of sucrose, glucose, or high fructose corn syrup ranges in quantity and is a potential contributor to the ongoing obesity problem in these children. Although many parents also today are often  unaware of the sugar content of several popular brands, in the form of sucrose, glucose, or high fructose corn syrup and are unaware  that 2-3 servings a day of these drinks are equal to 4-6 times the maximum recommended sugar intake . Yet, despite the magnitude of the obesity problem among children with genetic diseases. and the possibility that energy and sports drinks may be compounding this, there are very few active solutions discussed as what should be done to combat this threat. 

Biography

Anshoo Agarwal is currently working as Professor & Coordinator/ Incharge at Department of Pathology, Northern Border University, Arar Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She received her Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery from King George's Medical College Lucknow. Anshoo Agarwal received her M.D in Pathology from LLRM Medical College / Ch. Charan Singh University. She is an Associate professor and Discipline Coordinator in University Technology MARA, Malaysia. Anshoo Agarwal has served on many scientific memberships like Life member of Indian Association of Pathology and Microbiology, Member of International Academy Pathology, Life member of Indian Society of Hematology & Transfusion Medicine, Emirates Medical Association Pathology Society. Anshoo Agarwal has more than 80 publications. Anshoo Agarwal is editorial member of 3 journals and has many reviewed publications. Anshoo Agarwal research interests include Advance Haematology & Immunohaematology, Breast cancer and Anticancer vaccines.

Publications and presentations in National and International conferences -more than 200 organized seminars, CME’s, lectures, workshops and participated in the conferences-more than 300 Research projects supervisor -more than 100 Teaching the Undergraduate Medical, Dental, Nursing, Allied Health Professional and Postgraduate students for more than 20 years.